'When Ladies Meet': THR's 1933 Review

On June 23, 1933, director Harry Beaumont's adaptation of When Ladies Meet hit the big screen. The film would go on to nab an Oscar nomination for art direction at the 6th Academy Awards ceremony. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below.

It may be humanly impossible to produce a 100 percent perfect picture, but we'll shout from the housetops that When Ladies Meet is 99 percent above criticism, without fear of successful contradiction. Put down the one percent of theoretical flaw to the delicate tightening that an expert editor may have to do — we'd hate ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Copyrights Will Expire for 35 Silent Films By Charlie Chaplin, Cecil B. DeMille, Buster Keaton, and More

Copyrights Will Expire for 35 Silent Films By Charlie Chaplin, Cecil B. DeMille, Buster Keaton, and More
Films by Charlie Chaplin, Cecil B. DeMille, and Buster Keaton are among the “hundreds of thousands” of books, musical scores, and motion pictures that will enter the public domain on January 1, according to The Atlantic. All of the works were first made available to audiences in 1923, four years before the introduction of talkies. Due to changed copyright laws, this will be the largest collection of material to lose its copyright protections since 1998.

Artists looking to incorporate black-and-white era throwbacks into their modern creations will have lots of new options. The Atlantic consulted unpublished research from Duke University School of Law’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain, which shared with IndieWire a list of 35 films that will soon become available to all.

“Our list is therefore only a partial one; many more works are entering the public domain as well, but the relevant information to confirm this may
See full article at Indiewire »

I Am Not Your Negro review – thrilling James Baldwin documentary

The civil-rights-era writer’s words are brought to life by Samuel L Jackson in a primer on the writer’s work

James Baldwin was one of the most important voices to document the civil rights movement. Black and gay, he was also one of the sharpest writers of his generation, with the most beautiful prose. Working from Baldwin’s unfinished 30-page manuscript Remember This House, Raoul Peck’s documentary animates his words with Samuel L Jackson’s voice, illustrating them with archive footage of adverts, interviews, newsreels, film clips (mostly from the 1930s, such as Harry Beaumont’s Dance, Fools, Dance and Mervyn LeRoy’s They Won’t Forget) and still photographs of Black Lives Matter protests. In the text, Baldwin describes wanting the lives of his friends and fellow activists Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr to “bang against each other” as they did before their eventual assassinations.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Gentleman of letters by Anne-Katrin Titze

Gay Talese on James Baldwin: "Baldwin had his words and his voice in the forefront of the change in American politics."

In the 1960s, Gay Talese developed a friendship with James Baldwin when they were regular contributors to Esquire magazine along with Norman Mailer, Tom Wolfe, Gore Vidal, William F Buckley Jr, and others and he stayed in touch with Baldwin until his death in 1987. In Raoul Peck's I Am Not Your Negro, James Baldwin's writing is voiced by Samuel L Jackson over clips from movies that include an Indian-shooting John Wayne in John Ford's Stagecoach, Harry Beaumont's Dance, Fools, Dance with a tap dancing Joan Crawford, Sydney Poitier and Rod Steiger's goodbye in Norman Jewison's In The Heat Of The Night, and Richard Widmark's breakdown in Joseph L Mankiewicz's No Way Out.

Anne-Katrin Titze captures High Notes author Gay Talese Photo:
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Gentleman of letters by Anne-Katrin Titze

In the 1960s, Gay Talese developed a friendship with James Baldwin when they were regular contributors to Esquire magazine along with Norman Mailer, Tom Wolfe, Gore Vidal, William F Buckley Jr, and others and he stayed in touch with Baldwin until his death in 1987. In Raoul Peck's I Am Not Your Negro, James Baldwin's writing is voiced by Samuel L Jackson over clips from movies that include an Indian-shooting John Wayne in John Ford's Stagecoach, Harry Beaumont's Dance, Fools, Dance with a tap dancing Joan Crawford, Sydney Poitier and Rod Steiger's goodbye in Norman Jewison's In The Heat Of The Night, and Richard Widmark's breakdown in Joseph L Mankiewicz's No Way Out.

Gay Talese notes that one of the New Yorker's great achievements was when editor William Shawn published James Baldwin's Letter From A Region In My Mind. Truman Capote's In Cold.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Chances at a Best Picture Oscar for ‘Spotlight’ May be Hurt by Lack of Nominations in Other Categories

By Patrick Shanley

Managing Editor

The long wait is almost over, as tomorrow the Academy will announce the official nominations for the 88th Academy Awards. Those who have been following this season’s race are well aware that things are as knotted up as they have been in a long time, with no clear-cut front runner having emerged.

The Golden Globes may have been a bit of an indicator to Oscar’s decisions, but with a race this tight Globe wins may not be as solid of indicators as one might think.

Even films that once seemed like major Oscar contenders in multiple categories are now looking to be limited to a much smaller number of noms due to stiff competition. One such film is Spotlight, which lit up the Oscar landscape not too long ago with its strong cast and direction, but it now seems that the number of legitimate supporting actor candidates,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Forbidden Hollywood Volume 9

Depraved convicts ! Crazy Manhattan gin parties! Society dames poaching other women's husbands! A flimflam artist scamming the uptown sophisticates! All these forbidden attractions are here and more -- including Bette Davis's epochal seduction line about impulsive kissing versus good hair care. It's a 9th collection of racy pre-Code wonders. Forbidden Hollywood Volume 9 Big City Blues, Hell's Highway, The Cabin in the Cotton, When Ladies Meet, I Sell Anything DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1932-1934 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 63, 62, 78, 85, 70 min. / Street Date October 27, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 40.99 Starring Joan Blondell, Eric Linden, Humphrey Bogart; Richard Dix, Tom Brown; Richard Barthelmess, Bette Davis, Dorothy Jordan, Berton Churchill; Ann Harding, Robert Montgomery, Myrna Loy, Alice Brady, Frank Morgan; Pat O' Brien, Ann Dvorak, Claire Dodd, Roscoe Karns. Cinematography James Van Trees; Edward Cronjager; Barney McGill; Ray June Written by Lillie Hayward, Ward Morehouse, from his play; Samuel Ornitz, Robert Tasker, Rowland Brown
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

MGM's Lioness, the Epitome of Hollywood Superstardom, Has Her Day on TCM

Joan Crawford Movie Star Joan Crawford movies on TCM: Underrated actress, top star in several of her greatest roles If there was ever a professional who was utterly, completely, wholeheartedly dedicated to her work, Joan Crawford was it. Ambitious, driven, talented, smart, obsessive, calculating, she had whatever it took – and more – to reach the top and stay there. Nearly four decades after her death, Crawford, the star to end all stars, remains one of the iconic performers of the 20th century. Deservedly so, once you choose to bypass the Mommie Dearest inanity and focus on her film work. From the get-go, she was a capable actress; look for the hard-to-find silents The Understanding Heart (1927) and The Taxi Dancer (1927), and check her out in the more easily accessible The Unknown (1927) and Our Dancing Daughters (1928). By the early '30s, Joan Crawford had become a first-rate film actress, far more naturalistic than
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Rare Silent Film Actor Who Had Long Talkie Career Is TCM's Star of the Day

Adolphe Menjou movies today (This article is currently being revised.) Despite countless stories to the contrary, numerous silent film performers managed to survive the coming of sound. Adolphe Menjou, however, is a special case in that he not only remained a leading man in the early sound era, but smoothly made the transition to top supporting player in mid-decade, a position he would continue to hold for the quarter of a century. Menjou is Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Day today, Aug. 3, as part of TCM's "Summer Under the Stars" 2015 series. Right now, TCM is showing William A. Wellman's A Star Is Born, the "original" version of the story about a small-town girl (Janet Gaynor) who becomes a Hollywood star, while her husband (Fredric March) boozes his way into oblivion. In typical Hollywood originality (not that things are any different elsewhere), this 1937 version of the story – produced by
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Two of Redford's Biggest Box-Office Hits on TCM Tonight

Robert Redford movies: TCM shows 'Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,' 'The Sting' They don't make movie stars like they used to, back in the days of Louis B. Mayer, Jack Warner, and Harry Cohn. That's what nostalgists have been bitching about for the last four or five decades; never mind the fact that movie stars have remained as big as ever despite the demise of the old studio system and the spectacular rise of television more than sixty years ago. This month of January 2015, Turner Classic Movies will be honoring one such post-studio era superstar: Robert Redford. Beginning this Monday evening, January 6, TCM will be presenting 15 Robert Redford movies. Tonight's entries include Redford's two biggest blockbusters, both directed by George Roy Hill and co-starring Paul Newman: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, which turned Redford, already in his early 30s, into a major film star to rival Rudolph Valentino,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Dracula Performer Dead at 104; Uncle Founded Universal Studios

Dracula’ 1931 actress Carla Laemmle dead at 104 (photo: Carla Laemmle ca. 1930) Carla Laemmle, a bit player in a handful of silent movies and at the dawn of the sound era — e.g., the horror classics The Phantom of the Opera (1925) and Dracula (1931) — and a niece of Universal Studios co-founder Carl Laemmle, died on June 12, 2014, at her Los Angeles home. Laemmle, who had reportedly been in good health, was 104 years old. Born Rebekah Isabelle Laemmle on October 20, 1909, in Chicago, Carla Laemmle was less known for her movie work than for having survived most of her contemporaries and for her family connection to the Universal mogul — her father, Joseph Laemmle, was Carl’s brother. ‘Dracula’ actress was a member of Carl Laemmle’s ‘very large faemmle’ "Uncle Carl Laemmle, Has a very large faemmle," once half-joked poet Ogden Nash, in reference to Laemmle’s penchant for hiring family members. As Laemmle’s niece,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Definitive Movie Musicals: 50-41

courtesy of flickeringmyth.com

50. Dancer in the Dark (2000)

Directed by Lars von Trier

Signature Song: “I’ve Seen It All” (http://youtu.be/d9zFt6M_GLo)

Who says people in a musical have to be able to sing? The list starts with a film directed by the director of Melancholia, Antichrist, and the recent Nymphomaniac films. Starring Björk, Dancer in the Dark takes place in the fantasy world of Selma, an immigrant from the Czeck Republic living in a blue-collar town in the United States. She lives on the property of a local police officer named Bill (David Morse) and his wife. She finds herself the object of a shy co-worker’s affection (Peter Stormare), but doesn’t entirely reciprocate, partly because she knows that she is slowly going blind. Terrified that her disease is hereditary and her son most certainly will get it, she works long hours at the factory,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Oscars 2014: What Are the Odds of a Best Picture-Best Director Split?

  • Moviefone
The 85-year history of the Academy Awards is rife with statistical oddities, and one that has the potential to play out this Sunday is among the most intriguing: a split between the films that win Best Picture and Best Director.

Though conventional wisdom has long held that only one film will walk away with both prizes on Oscar night, many pundits are predicting that the awards will instead go to two different movies this year, with "Gravity" director Alfonso Cuaron expected to snag the Best Director statuette, while "12 Years a Slave" (or "American Hustle," depending on where your loyalties lie) is the favorite to win Best Picture.

While such a split has occurred just 22 times since the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences started handing out trophies in 1929, four of the first five ceremonies produced a divide between the Best Director and Best Picture prizes. "Wings," dubbed the original
See full article at Moviefone »

The Forgotten: The Glove on the Mantelpiece

  • MUBI
Forgive me, I'm on a production designer kick at present.

According to Screen Deco by Edward Mandelbaum and Eric Myers, MGM's head of department Cedric Gibbons was an early exponent of the constructed set, back in the early teens when rooms were often nothing more than painted flats. He's "the man who put the glove on the mantelpiece," meaning that before that you couldn't put anything on a mantelpiece since it was nothing but a trompe l'oeil bunch of brushstrokes. You'd have to put ball-bearings in your glove and magnetize it from behind, or something. Messy.

In 1928, the year sound came, Gibbons staged another, quiet revolution with Our Dancing Daughters, an early Joan Crawford vehicle, and what's known as a "soundie"—there's sound effects and a recorded score, but no synch dialogue. (Odd moment: an offscreen voice calls for Joan to do her dance, and then her lips move soundlessly in reply,
See full article at MUBI »

Daily Viewing. David Cairns's "Pensive Crackle"

  • MUBI
"Here's a recently discovered experimental film from 1929, A Theatrical Hotel on 46th St, New York also known as Pensive Crackle," wrote David Cairns at his Shadowplay the other day. "It uses the particular quality of the early soundtrack, that 'warm bath of audio hiss' Guy Maddin has spoken of, with its accompanying soft crackle and bump, as an atmospheric effect, and lets it gradually seep into the onscreen characters, poisoning them as surely as a diet of gunpowder and wasp venom. It starts quite funny, and slowly turns bleaker and bleaker."

The date of that post: April 1. Today at the Chiseler, David notes that "a lot of people said nice things about the film, and I couldn't tell if they knew it was me and were playing along, or were genuinely taken in. There was no way to ask without seeming like the gullible one — I was hoisted by my own April Fool's petard.
See full article at MUBI »

Ralph Bellamy Movie Schedule: The Wolf Man, The Professionals, Carefree

Ralph Bellamy on TCM: Sunrise At Campobello, The Awful Truth Schedule (Et) and synopses from the TCM website: 6:00 Am Carefree (1938) A psychiatrist falls in love with the woman he's supposed to be nudging into marriage with someone else. Dir: Mark Sandrich. Cast: Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Ralph Bellamy. Bw-83 mins. 7:30 Am The Secret Six (1931) A secret society funds the investigation of a bootlegging gang. Dir: George Hill. Cast: Wallace Beery, Lewis Stone, John Mack Brown. Bw-84 mins. 9:00 Am Headline Shooter (1933) A newsreel photographer neglects his love life to get the perfect shot. Dir: Otto Brower. Cast: William Gargan, Frances Dee, Ralph Bellamy. Bw-61 mins. 10:15 Am Picture Snatcher (1933) An ex-con brings his crooked ways to a job as a news photographer. Dir: Lloyd Bacon. Cast: James Cagney, Ralph Bellamy, Patricia Ellis. Bw-77 mins. 11:45 Am The Wedding Night (1935) A married author falls for the beautiful farm girl
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Ralph Bellamy on TCM: Sunrise At Campobello, The Awful Truth

Ralph Bellamy, Greer Garson, Sunrise at Campobello Ralph Bellamy was what many would call a "dependable" player: always there (nearly 100 movies), always capable, (almost) always losing the girl. Why Bellamy never became a major movie star is beyond me — especially considering that guys like James Stewart, Fred MacMurray, Dick Powell, Don Ameche, Joseph Cotten, etc. were top leading men of that era. Perhaps Bellamy was just both too good-looking and too intelligent-looking to keep Ginger Rogers from Fred Astaire (Carefree), Irene Dunne and Rosalind Russell from Cary Grant (The Awful Truth and His Girl Friday, respectively), and Anna Sten from Gary Cooper (The Wedding Night). All four films — in addition to 11 other Ralph Bellamy movies — will be presented on Turner Classic Movies on Sunday, August 14, as part of TCM's "Summer Under the Stars" film series. [Ralph Bellamy Movie Schedule.] Unfortunately, there are no TCM premieres, but included are a few lesser-known titles, e.g.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Top 10 Weird and Wonderful Oscar Statistics You May Have Missed

  • Moviefone
Filed under: Oscar News, Awards, Cinematical

A lot ('The Social Network'!) of the experts ('The King's Speech'!) are obsessed ('The Fighter'!) with what will happen ('Inception'!) on Oscar night. ('Black Swan'!) Personally, I think it's much more interesting to look back and see what already has happened. And by using the magic of numbers, combined with the invaluable assistance of Wikipedia, I've come up with some rather amusing little tidbits. (Some of these you may have read before, but oh well. They're still cool.)

1a. 'The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King' (2003) won 11 Oscars out of 11 nominations. Statistically speaking, it's the king of the Oscar heap. Other 100% winners include 'Gigi' (1958) and 'The Last Emperor' (1987), both of which went 9 for 9, and 'It Happened One Night' (1934), which was 5 for 5.

1b. 'The Matrix' (1999) won 4 out of 4, and the 3 for
See full article at Moviefone »

Top 10 Weird and Wonderful Oscar Statistics You May Have Missed

Top 10 Weird and Wonderful Oscar Statistics You May Have Missed
Filed under: Oscar News, Awards, Cinematical

A lot ('The Social Network'!) of the experts ('The King's Speech'!) are obsessed ('The Fighter'!) with what will happen ('Inception'!) on Oscar night. ('Black Swan'!) Personally, I think it's much more interesting to look back and see what already has happened. And by using the magic of numbers, combined with the invaluable assistance of Wikipedia, I've come up with some rather amusing little tidbits. (Some of these you may have read before, but oh well. They're still cool.)

1a. 'The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King' (2003) won 11 Oscars out of 11 nominations. Statistically speaking, it's the king of the Oscar heap. Other 100% winners include 'Gigi' (1958) and 'The Last Emperor' (1987), both of which went 9 for 9, and 'It Happened One Night' (1934), which was 5 for 5.

1b. 'The Matrix' (1999) won 4 out of 4, and the 3 for
See full article at Cinematical »

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