Screen One (1985–2002)
8.1/10
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14 user 3 critic

A Foreign Field 

Veterans return to Normandy on the 50th anniversary of D-Day for their own special and poignant reasons, among them two looking for an old love who turns out to the same woman for both.

Director:

Charles Sturridge

Writers:

Roy Clarke (screenplay), Roy Clarke
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Alec Guinness ... Amos
Leo McKern ... Cyril
Edward Herrmann ... Ralph
John Randolph ... Waldo
Geraldine Chaplin ... Beverly
Lauren Bacall ... Lisa
Dorothy Grumbar Dorothy Grumbar ... Matron
Jeanne Moreau ... Angelique
Michelle Gheleyns-Hue Michelle Gheleyns-Hue ... Shopkeeper
Cateline Alteirac Cateline Alteirac ... Sales Assistant
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Storyline

Amos and Cyril are a pair of British veterans from WWII, going back to Normandy 50 years after D-Day to visit an old buddy's grave. There, they run into Waldo, an American WWII vet. And both Waldo and Cyril run into a French woman they were both enamored of in their soldiering days and begin squabbling over her. Waldo's son and daughter-in-law are putting up with him and each other. And the entire group meet up with a woman who has come to visit the grave of her brother. Together, they form an odd camaraderie, bound by the past as they share their memories Written by Kathy Li

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 September 1993 (UK) See more »

Filming Locations:

Calvados, France

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Trivia

Originally broadcast on BBC1 in the UK as part of their Screen One series. See more »

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User Reviews

 
One of the finest films of all time
16 December 2000 | by smokehillSee all my reviews

Without a doubt one of the finest and most under-viewed films ever made. I haven't seen it in over four years, but still get misty-eyed when recalling it -- particularly Alec Guinness' flawless, delicate little performance.

It should be required viewing. It's not bombastic like Citizen Kane, nor groundbreaking like Birth of a Nation. It's just theater at its absolute finest.


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