Route 66 (1960–1964)
6.8/10
21
5 user

...Shall Forfeit His Dog and Ten Shillings to the King 

Tod, still alone, is working in Apache Junction, Arizona at a dog racing track. When two men rob and kill the owner, Tod joins the posse trailing into the desert/mountains. The hidden ... See full summary »

Director:

Tom Gries
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Martin Milner ... Tod Stiles
George Maharis ... Buz Murdock (credit only)
Steve Cochran ... Hank Saxon
Kathleen Crowley ... Diana Kirk
Med Flory ... Terry
L.Q. Jones ... Babe
Gary Cockrell ... Landers
Bern Bassey Bern Bassey ... Del Pasado
Barbara Shelley ... Jeannie
John Anderson ... General Scranton
James Brown ... Sheriff Jimmy Haskell
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Storyline

Tod, still alone, is working in Apache Junction, Arizona at a dog racing track. When two men rob and kill the owner, Tod joins the posse trailing into the desert/mountains. The hidden reason for the crime eventually comes out and makes Tod wonder "can people only make themselves important at the expense of others?". Written by dubchi

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Genres:

Adventure

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 February 1963 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

Apache Junction, Arizona, USA

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title quotation is most likely taken from the Canute Laws of 1016 (England) written to govern ownership of Greyhounds (one figures prominently in the episode). The law read that if a Greyhound was found within the forest "the master or owner of the dog shall forfeit the dog and ten shillings to the king." See more »

Quotes

[last lines]
Tod Stiles: [Tod's inner soliloquy, heard as a voice over on the sound track] What made me come along? Why was I afraid not to go? Was it because I knew this was a moment I'd learn something important? Was I afraid to face it for whatever it was? All right, so what did I learn? That people can only make themselves important at the expense of others? These killings - were they murders? Were they sacrifices, each to a private reason, each to a hidden God? Do people really think that if they go ...
[...]
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User Reviews

2/22/63 "Shall Forfeit His Dog and Ten Shillings to the King"
4 November 2015 | by schappe1See all my reviews

This one takes palace in Arizona and uses the old western plot of a posse where the hero suspects, (correctly), that some members of the posse don't want to take the fugitives alive for reasons of their own. I've always thought that modern westerns should be successful on TV because they can use all the plots available to a western but also to a modern series.

Tod agrees to go on the posse because his employer has been killed in a robbery. Also along are James Brown, in his fifth appearance, each time as a lawman, playing the local sheriff; Med Flory as his disgruntled deputy, Steve Cochran as a friend of the victim and the "best tracker in the territory", an Indian who probably deserves that title more, Kathleen Crowley as the victim's much younger wife and John Anderson as a retired military officer with a heart condition who wants to prove he's still got it. Each has his own, selfish motives for what they do and Tod, at the end of it, winds up vowing that their selfishness and violence won't turn him into one of them.

Unlike other reviewers I didn't see any politics in this, just a conflict between good and evil within the human spirit. Here's what Tod says at the end: "Can people only make themselves important at the expense of others? These killings…were they sacrifices to a private reason…to a hidden God? Do people really think that if they go through life without hurting other people nobody will know they've been alive?"

George Maharis is still being listed in the credits but it's hard to tell what role he would have played here. I'm going to take a wild guess and suggest it might be the woman Tod talks to at the beginning who questions why he feels he has to go on this posse. Buz was always questioning why they would get involved in other people's problems. He always had a sixth sense about where the trouble might come from. Maybe they took his lines and gave it to a new character, a piano playing girlfriend of Tod's.


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