7.5/10
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189 user 294 critic

Trumbo (2015)

Trailer
2:32 | Trailer
In 1947, metacritic.com
Reviews
Popularity
3,464 ( 352)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 6 wins & 42 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Bryan Cranston ... Dalton Trumbo
Michael Stuhlbarg ... Edward G. Robinson
David Maldonado ... Rocco (as Dave Maldonado)
John Getz ... Sam Wood
Diane Lane ... Cleo Trumbo
Laura Flannery ... Party Goer
Helen Mirren ... Hedda Hopper
David James Elliott ... John Wayne
Toby Nichols ... Chris Trumbo (age 6-10) (as Tobias McDowell Nichols)
Joseph S. Martino Joseph S. Martino ... Rally Participant
Madison Wolfe ... Niki Trumbo (age 8-11)
Jason Bayle ... Young Father
James DuMont ... J. Parnell Thomas
Alan Tudyk ... Ian McLellan Hunter
Louis C.K. ... Arlen Hird
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Storyline

In 1947, Dalton Trumbo (Bryan Cranston) was Hollywood's top screenwriter until he and other artists were jailed and blacklisted for their political beliefs. TRUMBO (directed by Jay Roach) recounts how Dalton used words and wit to win two Academy Awards and expose the absurdity and injustice under the blacklist, which entangled everyone from gossip columnist Hedda Hopper (Helen Mirren) to John Wayne, Kirk Douglas and Otto Preminger. Written by Bleecker Street

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Are you now or have you ever been... See more »

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Certificate:

AL | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site | See more »

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 April 2016 (Netherlands) See more »

Also Known As:

Trambo See more »

Filming Locations:

New Orleans, Louisiana, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$15,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$74,177, 8 November 2015, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$7,857,741

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$11,430,025
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | Dolby Digital (as Dolby 5.1)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Based on a true story. See more »

Goofs

During the opening credits, the copyright year is the Roman number MCMXI, which is 1911. It should have been MMXV, for 2015. See more »

Quotes

Niki Trumbo: [about their neighbor] He knows. He sees Kirk Douglas coming in and out of here. And Otto Preminger and his Rolls. He's an idiot. But he's not stupid.
[Trumbo chuckles]
Niki Trumbo: Has he called the FBI? Congress? No, because everything they can do, they've already done. That Oscar belongs to you. Get it!
Dalton Trumbo: My God! You're nothing like me. You're worse.
[Niki smiles]
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Crazy Credits

As the credit scroll begins, photos of the real Dalton Trumbo, his family and other people portrayed in the film are shown. These are followed by historical footage of Trumbo giving an interview (from the same one where he acknowledges that he is 'Robert Rich'). See more »

Connections

References The Fighting Seabees (1944) See more »

Soundtracks

The Mood I'm In
Written by Delores Cherry Leatherwood
Performed by Camille Howard
Courtesy of Specialty Records
Used by permission of Concord Music Group, Inc.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
70 Years On, Some People Still Want to Tell Others What to Think
8 December 2015 | by vsksSee all my reviews

After practically having the frequently shown previews for Trumbo memorized, I finally saw the film itself. (Though one trailer scene with Helen Mirren didn't actually appear in the movie. Weird.) As you undoubtedly know, Trumbo is the story of the Hollywood 10, writers blacklisted during the communist witch-hunts of the late 1940s and 1950s. Joe McCarthy and all that. When called before the House Un-American Activities Committee, Dalton Trumbo (played beautifully by Bryan Cranston) and the other nine refused to give Congress information about their beliefs or to rat out others in the film industry. As a result, a number of them including Trumbo went to prison for contempt of Congress ("I AM contemptuous of Congress," he said after the HUAC hearing). He was in the slammer for 10 months and once he was out could no longer get work. Meanwhile, some industry personages—in the movie, producer Buddy Ross (Roger Bart) and actor Edward G. Robinson (Michael Stuhlbarg)—saw their careers going up in smoke and did testify (though in real life, Robinson did not name names). The movie effectively skewers that Great American Flag-Waving Hero, John Wayne, who managed to avoid any military service during World War II and Korea. "If you're going to act as if you won the war single-handedly," Trumbo tells him, "it would be more believable if you'd actually served," as he and so many of his black-listed colleagues had. They represent the tip of the iceberg of people harmed by the virulent anti-Communism of the day, and although the movie is about the Hollywood 10, it's really about the Hollywood One, Trumbo, the most accomplished of the lot. The composite character Arlen Hird has the unenviable job of being Trumbo's verbal sparring partner and representing an amalgam of several of the harder-line writers' views. Trumbo is unfailingly supportive of him, even though he inserts his political views into scripts (which Trumbo rewrites) and clearly doesn't trust Trumbo. (This is where the "You talk like a radical, but you live like a rich man" line from the trailer fits in.) While not a lot of acting was required of Diane Lane as Trumbo's wife, she did a fine job, and Helen Mirren is perfect as the odious Hedda Hopper, blackmailer without portfolio. As writer Hird, comedian Louis C.K.'s acting inexperience shows a bit, as he's up against such acting superstars, while John Goodman is all prickly geniality and Alan Tudyk plays a credible Ian McLellan Hunter. Hunter wins the Academy Award for the Roman Holiday script (the Gregory Peck, Audrey Hepburn classic), but Trumbo wrote it. In fact, Trumbo and the others write many screenplays for which they receive credit only belatedly, if at all. The back of the blacklist can't be broken until a few Hollywood luminaries are willing to give appropriate screen credit. Directed by Jay Roach with a solid script from John McNamara. While in their vision, the character of Trumbo doesn't change much over the course of the story—except perhaps to learn not to take what he most cherishes for granted—"he is no more or less principled at the end than he was at the start," said Anthony Lane in The New Yorker. He is forgiving, though, and in the end acknowledges that all humans are a mix of good acts and bad (except perhaps for Hedda Hopper). The real opportunity for learning lies with the audience. While those anti-Communist days may now seem rather quaint—Congress taking on a bunch of two-fingered typists—there always are people who believe they know best what other people should think, who believe others are too dim or inattentive to grasp hidden political messages, who think citizens are like children who have to be protected from difficult ideas. That, the movie Trumbo seems to say, is still the danger. Another film well worth the price of a ticket.


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